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Aug

2010

Peak Oil? Yes! Peak Food? I Don’t Think So!
Sunday, 08 August 2010 18:21
by Kellia Ramares

Earlier today, Michael C. Ruppert, former editor and publisher of the newsletter and web site From The Wilderness and currently publisher of the web site collapse.net, put a video clip called “Global and US Food Price Alert” online. I found it on Facebook and it is also on You Tube. Doubtless, it is other places as well, but these are the two places where I accessed it.

This clip, made on August 4th, is a 1:13 teaser to a longer video made available to paid Collapse.net members. You can pay ten dollars per month to be a member to see the whole thing. I am not currently a member so I have not seen the entire video. However I had a strong reaction to the part I did see, in which Ruppert stated that he saw, in a 24-36 hour news cycle, “almost an epidemic of stories from some of the biggest financial publications and news entities in the world” proclaiming that global food prices were about to “soar.” Ruppert said that after reading the stories, he came to the conclusion that “it’s quite possible we have arrived suddenly at Peak Food.”

I issued the following response on Facebook, both on my personal page and on “The End of Money” page that I founded earlier this year to promote discussion of ending monetary systems and working “for a living” as we know them today. I believe that doing those two things is the key to post-industrial prosperity:

“How do you know that the stories were not planted in the corporate media so that people would be scared into accepting the Monsanto "solution" for food crises? So often, corporations/governments create the problem e.g. 9-11, so they can propose their solution e.g. global war on terror and clamp down of dissent. And you know that so much of the media is under corporate control that the fact that so many stories came out at the same time should be a big RED flag.

I believe Peak Oil because oil is a finite resource whose decline has been measured over time. Food is not the same beast that oil is. Production levels are variable; a potato field can yield more a season after a bad harvest, whereas once an oil field is in decline, it won't produce at higher levels later on. We have ready alternatives for food production: We can go back to the organic production methods we had before WWII. No need to invent anything new.

Yes, there are places in the world that are having bad harvests and food shortages. But the overall problem globally is not production but distribution. e.g. The US takes the official position that there is no human right to food, only an opportunity to buy food.
 

Here is another example of why we must abolish money-based economics and the sooner the better for humanity and the rest of the planet. Why must we pay to live on the planet we're born on? Why must we be profitable to someone else, or something else, a corporation, before we can eat?

Don't swallow this Kool-Aid, Mike. There's tons of food at my local Whole Foods Market and I don't expect bare shelves next week. However, I expect that the store will discard much of that food because it was not purchased within the prescribed time. Talk to me about Peak Food when the US and UK stop wasting so much food.”

I have not read the articles that Ruppert has read, so I do not know why they predict world food prices imminently soaring. I am aware that Russia has had a bad harvest and has recently halted grain exports. This and other factors around the world may indeed lead to soaring food prices...for a while. But Peak Food? For the reasons I stated above, the very concept does not make sense.

Unfortunately, the concept of “peak” may have, for lack of a better term, “jumped the shark.” It fits in the context of oil and other finite resources such as uranium. But it makes no sense when one is talking about renewable resources such as crops. And it makes no sense when the problem is less with the supply of natural resources than with the political will to use them wisely and distribute their fruits, literally and figuratively, in an equitable manner.

So if food prices do soar, I will ask if agribusiness is behind it, as it is hell bent on things such as GMOs, chemical additives, seed patents, privatization of water resources, and any other thing it can attempt in order to monopolize the stuff of life for the purpose of profit. After all, big corporations and their government lackeys have done much already to ruin the peace, health and prosperity of billions around the world. Soaring food process would be consistent with past practice.

 
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Franky schiemer said:

0
peak food
So the problem is distribution? So how will you distribute food once oil becomes prohibitively expensive? So there's tons of food at your local Whole Foods Market and you conclude from this that the whole world can go organic and everything will just be fine?
 
August 08, 2010
Votes: +1

Sue said:

0
...
"I believe Peak Oil because oil is a finite resource whose decline has been measured over time. Food is not the same beast that oil is. Production levels are variable; a potato field can yield more a season after a bad harvest, whereas once an oil field is in decline, it won't produce at higher levels later on. We have ready alternatives for food production: We can go back to the organic production methods we had before WWII. No need to invent anything new."

Food IS the same beast, without the massive input of fossil fuel to maintain our industrial farming system we cannot grow enough food to support even the present population. Oil is needed in every aspect of our (and the worlds) food production, from the production of the gmo seed, planting, oil based fertilizer and weed spray, equipment and energy needed to irrigate land that would otherwise only grow cactus, then add on the shipping to factories to process it into the "ready to eat food" that Americans survive on. The fact that our aquifers are drying up and our population increases by the hour and the continued salinization of the dirt that is needed to grow food it's a pretty darned important thing.

Organic production of food could never keep up with our population. For one thing we would need to go back to a farm economy, considering only 1% of our population still farms and many of them are getting pretty old, lots of people are going to need to get off their bums and learn how to use a hoe. Ad in climate change, drought, flood, early frost freeze cycles and the future is looking to be an interesting time.

True, your supermarket shelves are loaded but that could change very quickly in an emergency or crisis. How often do you cook at home? Do you even know how to cook beans, grains or have enough food and water in your home to get you through a day? much less a week. Americans always claim to be so self sufficient but boy do they start crying for Uncle Sams when TSHTF. How about everyone start taking some real responsibility for themselves, tear up that chemical soaked lawn and learn to grow and preserve some of your own food.

Granted food shortages probably won't happen here this year but it will be hitting us soon. In the meantime prices will rise and the underemployed, working poor and the growing unemployed population will be getting hungrier and hungrier. Hungry people with nothing to lose do not make for a secure country.

The MSM is all propiganda anyway, but all you have to do is dig around a bit on the web to find fact based real info also.
 
August 08, 2010
Votes: +1

Sue said:

0
...
"I believe Peak Oil because oil is a finite resource whose decline has been measured over time. Food is not the same beast that oil is. Production levels are variable; a potato field can yield more a season after a bad harvest, whereas once an oil field is in decline, it won't produce at higher levels later on. We have ready alternatives for food production: We can go back to the organic production methods we had before WWII. No need to invent anything new."

Food IS the same beast, without the massive input of fossil fuel to maintain our industrial farming system we cannot grow enough food to support even the present population. Oil is needed in every aspect of our (and the worlds) food production, from the production of the gmo seed, planting, oil based fertilizer and weed spray, equipment and energy needed to irrigate land that would otherwise only grow cactus, then add on the shipping to factories to process it into the "ready to eat food" that Americans survive on. The fact that our aquifers are drying up and our population increases by the hour and the continued salinization of the dirt that is needed to grow food it's a pretty darned important thing.

Organic production of food could never keep up with our population. For one thing we would need to go back to a farm economy, considering only 1% of our population still farms and many of them are getting pretty old, lots of people are going to need to get off their bums and learn how to use a hoe. Ad in climate change, drought, flood, early frost freeze cycles and the future is looking to be an interesting time.

True, your supermarket shelves are loaded but that could change very quickly in an emergency or crisis. How often do you cook at home? Do you even know how to cook beans, grains or have enough food and water in your home to get you through a day? much less a week. Americans always claim to be so self sufficient but boy do they start crying for Uncle Sams when TSHTF. How about everyone start taking some real responsibility for themselves, tear up that chemical soaked lawn and learn to grow and preserve some of your own food.

Granted food shortages probably won't happen here this year but it will be hitting us soon. In the meantime prices will rise and the underemployed, working poor and the growing unemployed population will be getting hungrier and hungrier. Hungry people with nothing to lose do not make for a secure country.

The MSM is all propiganda anyway, thats why more are using the web.
 
August 08, 2010
Votes: +0

Jeff said:

0
To quote Maxwell Smart: "Missed it by *that* much."
The comments I see on this are missing the forest for the trees. So far, it seems to be along the lines of, "But oil moves the products to our grocery store shelves" and links food with oil. This is a logical conclusion, granted, but it seems to miss a lot of facts.

Fact #1: Grow locally, buy locally. Less oil consumption.

Fact #2: Peak oil doesn't equate to oil suddenly being gone. Rather, it has reached its PEAK, and now it is declining...hopefully people will wise up to this and begin making changes now instead of waiting until the gas lines start up again.

Fact #3: We don't have to have the variety that we have been conditioned into having. We can subsist on simpler meals more frequently. Believe me, this is a hard one for me too - I'm a chef!

Fact #4: It's not Benihana, it's not Red Lobster, it's not even McDonald's, but if you have the space or even a few planters, try growing your own vegetables! Tomato plants can be grown from inverted planters (hanging down instead of growing from a pot and being trellised) - it's fresher, it doesn't use any oil, it's healthier and it's yours!

Fact #5: It's been stated numerous times, but should be doubly stated in the United States in particular: EAT LESS!

I could go on for awhile, but you can see from the above examples here that it's not just trucks carrying food to Whole Foods and we then being good consumers and CONSUMING. It's about a wholly different mindset - one that we had before as a nation, and one that we need to return to.
 
August 09, 2010
Votes: -1

tubette said:

0
...
You should watch the documentary "Collapse".. It is much more than about food.
 
August 15, 2010
Votes: +0

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